IT Tribal Knowledge & Business Value

What does it mean when the key technology expert suddenly finds another job? Once or twice a year, for the last twenty years I get a call like this.

James, our top IT guy just put in his two weeks notice. I’m not sure we can function without him. What should we do? Could you come over and help!

What I’ve found is that there are three reasons key technical people leave:

  • About 20% of the time – The person is bored, went interviewing and got a much better offer.
  • About 40% of the time – The person realizes they are in over their heads in that the technology requirements have passed their understanding and experience. Unfortunately, the person is not able to express this to management (or management just won’t listen). So they abruptly leave.
  • Again about 40% of the time – The person was too ignorant to realize they were in over their heads. Later the IT Technician sees a major technical emergency in the company’s future. Something so bad, usually business impacting, that will get them fired. Instead of telling someone, they find another role at another company. It may be 1 week to 6 months later before everything begins falling apart at the original company.
Topics: Due Diligence IT Due Diligence Tribal Knowledge Business Value Investment Banking

The secret of 80/20 in IT Due Diligence

Which is better a $10,000 or $40,000 return for the same investment?

 

In the past, there have been ideas that were ahead of their time. So far ahead, that they were quickly forgotten. Then “re-discovered” decades later. An example would be Chaos Theory (1969) and the Pareto Principle (1941). At their core, both these concepts have their roots in the work of Vilfredo Pareto who first pointed out the 80/20 correlations in 1896. In 1941, Joseph Juran described the rule saying that “…80% of problems are caused by only 20% of causes…”. This has led to business axioms like:

    • 80% of Sales are made by only 20% of the sales team.
    • 80% of company purchases are made by only 20% of customers.
Topics: Due Diligence IT Due Diligence Technical Advantage 80/20 Strategies Pareto principle Investment Banking Mid-Market

M&A Due Diligence

Introducing, M&A IT Due Diligence

Due diligence is a comprehensive appraisal of a business undertaken by a prospective buyer, to establish its assets and liabilities to evaluate its commercial potential. M&A experts perform due diligence when they buy a business. Traditionally this due diligence has focused on the financial, managerial and business operations. The question for the modern M&A professional, "...is this enough?"

Topics: IT Due Diligence Due Diligence Customer Aquisition

Top 5 Merger & Acquisition (M&A) Strategic Drivers

M&A Strategies for Buying a Business

Why do Investment Bankers buy businesses? Beginning in 2018, according to a survey done by Deloitte, the top strategic drivers motivating business buys in 2018 has been:

(20%)     Technology Acquisition*
(19%)     Expanding Customer base
(16%)     Expand Product or Service lines
(12%)     Digital Strategy
(9%)       Talent Acquisition

   *Up from 16% in 2017

Topics: IT Due Diligence Business buying strategies Business Transition Due Diligence